Home & FamilyParentingSummer Learning Adds Up To Better Grades

Summer Learning Adds Up To Better Grades

School’s out for the summer and there are approximately 2 months of free time on hand. That’s 8 weeks, give or take.

At minimum, that is 56 days spent out of school.  But even though the classroom is closed for the season, it doesn’t mean that a child’s brain has switched off.

No matter how you add it up, without some amount of formal learning over the summer, kids can experience a significant drop in their academic momentum, which can affect how they perform next year. In fact, ongoing studies show that students generally score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer than they do on the same tests at the beginning of the summer.

Summer learning studies show some pretty surprising numbers:

  • 100% of students experience academic learning losses when they do not engage in educational activities in the summer.
  • Students lose approximately 2.6 months of grade-level equivalency in math skills over the summer.
  • 56% of students want to be involved in a summer program that keeps them learning.
  • Teachers spend, on average, between four to six weeks re-teaching material students have forgotten over the summer.

Here’s what those numbers mean to your child: 

A slower start in when school starts back up—about 2.6 months spend in review and not in learning new material.  (It’s coincidentally almost the same number as the length of summer break!)

And here are two more numbers that are important to your child: 

2-3—this is approximate number of hours per week of learning that your child should be engaging in to avoid summer learning losses.

Whether it’s workbooks at home, dedicated reading and discussion time, or an academic class, a couple of hours a week of learning over the summer means a 100% better chance of having a great school year next grade.  We think those numbers add up, don’t you?

 

Oxford Learning provides supplemental education services across North America. It offers programs for young people from preschool through university, and its cognitive approach goes beyond tutoring to ignite a lifelong love of learning. Find out more at http://www.OxfordLearning.com.

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